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Early English Metre (Toronto Old English Studies) by Thomas A. Bredehoft

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Published by University of Toronto Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Poetry & poets: classical, early & medieval,
  • Middle English, 1100-1500,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • English,
  • Medieval,
  • ca 450-1100 (Vieil anglais),
  • Old English, ca. 450-1100,
  • English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh,
  • Literary Criticism & Collections / Medieval,
  • Anglais (Langue),
  • English language,
  • Versification

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages225
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7873002M
ISBN 10080203831X
ISBN 109780802038319

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Synopsis Thomas A. Bredehoft's Early English Metre is a reassessment of the metrical rules for English poetry from Beowulf to Layamon. Bredehoft offers a new account of many of the most puzzling features of Old English poetry - anacrusis, alliteration patterns, rhyme, and hypermetric verses - and further offers a clear account of late Old English verse as it descended from the classical verse. Early English Metre presents a new perspective on early English verse and a new perspective on much of early English literary history. It is an essential addition to the literature on Old and Middle English and will be widely discussed among scholars in the field."--Jacket. Book. Early English Metre Details Author(s): Thomas Bredehoft Publisher: University of Toronto Press eISBN: Subjects: Literary Studies. Early English Metre eBook by Thomas Bredehoft Kobo Edition | Buy the Kobo ebook Book Early English Metre by Thomas Bredehoft at , Canada's largest bookstore. Free shipping and pickup in store on eligible orders. Black lives, stories & voices matter – today & every day.

The early Middle English period Poetry. The Norman Conquest worked no immediate transformation on either the language or the literature of the English. Older poetry continued to be copied during the last half of the 11th century; two poems of the early 12th century—“ Durham,” which praises that city’s cathedral and its relics, and “Instructions for Christians,” a didactic piece. The seminal research on Old English metre was undertaken by Eduard Sievers in the nineteenth century. Sievers made some great leaps and his ideas are still often repeated, but unfortunately they do not really explain how Old English poetry works. The Bay Psalm Book is a metrical Psalter first printed in in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It was the first book printed in British North America. The Psalms in it are metrical translations into English. This study uses evidence from early English verse to reconstruct the course of some central phonological changes in the history of the language. It builds on the premise that alliteration reflects faithfully the acoustic identity and similarity of stressed syllable onsets. Individual chapters.

"Thomas A. Bredehoft's Early English Metre is a reassessment of the metrical rules for English poetry from Beowulf to Layamon. Bredehoft offers a new account of many of the most puzzling features of Old English poetry - anacrusis, alliteration patterns, rhyme, and hypermetric verses - and further offers a clear account of late Old English verse as it descended from the classical verse as. The Wanderer is an Old English poem preserved only in an anthology known as the Exeter Book, a manuscript dating from the late 10th century. It counts lines of alliterative verse. As is often the case in Anglo-Saxon verse, the composer and compiler are . • Book for the beginner in Anglo-Saxon, comprising a short grammar, some selections from the gospels, and a parsing glossary, by John Earle () • Hand-book of Anglo-Saxon and early English by Hiram Corson () • Manual of Anglo-Saxon for beginners, comprising a grammar, reader, and glossary, with explanatory notes, by Samuel Shute (). English literature - English literature - The lyric: The lyric was virtually unknown to Old English poets. Poems such as “Deor” and “Wulf and Eadwacer,” which have been called lyrics, are thematically different from those that began to circulate orally in the 12th century and to be written down in great numbers in the 13th; these Old English poems also have a stronger narrative.